Christian. 20. Gay. Texan. Musical Theatre enthusiast.


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Aug 22, 2014
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Aug 22, 2014
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Aug 22, 2014
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Carrie Brownstein + Chloë Sevigny on Portlandia.

(Source: dyadically, via bearlectraheart)


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Aug 22, 2014
@ 2:25 am
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elisaddiq:

the acceptance of her flaws is what made her flawless

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Aug 22, 2014
@ 2:25 am
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sylvysparrow:

…i’m listening.

sylvysparrow:

…i’m listening.

(via prancingaboutthewoods)


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Aug 22, 2014
@ 2:03 am
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Aug 22, 2014
@ 1:58 am
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gayeskimos:

If you do not know what this picture is; let me inform you. In the late 50’s when abortion was completely illegal, women would resort to using household items to have a self-given abortion. These items included  bleach, wire hangers, and cleaning products.  So, would you rather save unborn cells, like the ones that come off your feet or body, millions at a time, or save a woman who might end up curing a life-threatening disease?  Do we really wanna step 60 years back?

gayeskimos:

If you do not know what this picture is; let me inform you. In the late 50’s when abortion was completely illegal, women would resort to using household items to have a self-given abortion. These items included bleach, wire hangers, and cleaning products. So, would you rather save unborn cells, like the ones that come off your feet or body, millions at a time, or save a woman who might end up curing a life-threatening disease? Do we really wanna step 60 years back?

(via blacksmithbear)


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Aug 22, 2014
@ 1:48 am
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(via jordotheweirdo)


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Aug 22, 2014
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Aug 22, 2014
@ 1:42 am
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freelgbtqpia:


Over time, male homosexuality and effeminacy have become indelibly associated, sometimes even synonymous. In Faeries, Bears, and Leathermen, Peter Hennen contends that this stigma of effeminacy exerts a powerful influence on gay subcultures. Through a comparative ethnographic analysis of three communities, Hennen explores the surprising ways that conventional masculinity is being collectively challenged, subverted, or perpetuated in contemporary gay male culture. Hennen’s colorful study focuses on a trio of groups: the Radical Faeries, who parody effeminacy by playfully embracing it, donning prom dresses and glitter; the Bears, who strive to appear like regular guys and celebrate their larger, hairier bodies; and the Leathermen, who emulate hypermasculine biker culture, simultaneously paying homage to and undermining notions of manliness.
Along with a historical analysis of the association between effeminacy and homosexuality, Hennen examines how this connection affects the groups’ sexual practices. Ultimately, he argues, while all three groups adopt innovative approaches to gender issues and sexual pleasure, masculine norms continue to constrain members of each community.

[PDF]

freelgbtqpia:

Over time, male homosexuality and effeminacy have become indelibly associated, sometimes even synonymous. In Faeries, Bears, and Leathermen, Peter Hennen contends that this stigma of effeminacy exerts a powerful influence on gay subcultures. Through a comparative ethnographic analysis of three communities, Hennen explores the surprising ways that conventional masculinity is being collectively challenged, subverted, or perpetuated in contemporary gay male culture.
Hennen’s colorful study focuses on a trio of groups: the Radical Faeries, who parody effeminacy by playfully embracing it, donning prom dresses and glitter; the Bears, who strive to appear like regular guys and celebrate their larger, hairier bodies; and the Leathermen, who emulate hypermasculine biker culture, simultaneously paying homage to and undermining notions of manliness.

Along with a historical analysis of the association between effeminacy and homosexuality, Hennen examines how this connection affects the groups’ sexual practices. Ultimately, he argues, while all three groups adopt innovative approaches to gender issues and sexual pleasure, masculine norms continue to constrain members of each community.

[PDF]